Annex 9


EUPIGCLASS GROWTH Project GRD-1999-10914                             August 2003   

                                                                         

Pork production and classification of pig carcasses in European countries.

 

 

Ingemar Hansson

Department of Food Science, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden

 

 

Introduction

 

Most of the pigs for the European market are reared and slaughtered in Europe. Despite the high pressure and competition from the world market, the European pig producers seem to manage the situations. The consumer’s interest for pork meat in their daily meals is increasing. The market and consumers prefer meaty carcasses with low fat content. Thus it is the task for the producer to use breeds and feed the pigs in order to fulfil the tasks and wishes. To assure that the carcasses and meats are of high quality classification systems are used. The aim of this report is to summarise information, obtained from a questionnaire and from official statistics, about pork production in European countries. The information is used as base for the outline of the Quality Assurance Program (QAP) for classification.

 

The production of pork has been increasing during the last decades and during the year 2002 more than 1.2 billion pigs were sent for slaughter in all pork producing countries combined. The total production during this year was expected to amount to 85 million tons. More than 50 percent of those pigs were raised, slaughtered and consumed within Mainland China. Other regions with great production are United States, South America, EU-15, Central and Eastern Europe and Russia. On the world pork market the greatest importers are Japan, Russia, United States and Hong Kong, while the greatest exporters are United States, Canada, EU-15 and Taiwan.

 

Within the EU-15 countries, pork production amounts to 205 million pigs during the year 2001. If the Central and Eastern European countries are included the production in Europe was 260 million pigs, giving about 21 million tons of pork, most of which was consumed in the domestic markets within Europe.

 

The greatest pork producing country in Europe is Germany with about 40 million pigs slaughtered per year followed by Spain, France, Denmark and the Netherlands. Figures about number of pigs slaughtered can be found in ordinary statistical reports but information concerning pig populations and production as well as information about the structure of the slaughter industry and market is difficult to find. There are great changes in the slaughter industry and data has short validity.

 

One of the tasks in the EUPIGCLASS project is to describe the situation in pig carcass classification in Europe. Another task is to elaborate a general outline of a Quality Assurance Programme (QAP) that could be used in all countries to guarantee that classification and grading of pig carcasses is performed according to rules and recommendations.

 

The development of the QAP must be based on true data about numbers and quality of carcasses as well as of systems used for classification. The only way to gather this information was to distribute a questionnaire concerning pork production and classification to persons working within this area in the different countries. In this report data and information about pork production and classification of pig carcasses is presented.

 

Questionnaire and official statistics

 

The questionnaire was sent to persons with knowledge of pork production in the EU-15 and NAS countries. Information was also found in official production statistic reports. The results are summarised in Tables 1 and 2 and are presented country by country.

 

The questionnaires were answered and returned from nearly all countries. When more data was needed, this lacking information was taken from official statistics or technical or marketing reports.

 

Pork production in Europe is to a great extent based on crossbreeding with the use of crossbred sows (mostly white breeds) sired with boars of Hampshire, Duroc or Pietrain breeds or synthetic lines, or backcrossed with “white” boars. In most countries the breeding goal is to increase leanness and improve meat quality. Male pigs are castrated in all countries except in Ireland, UK and Spain. In most countries the average carcass weight (dressed according to EU rules for dressing) is less than 95 kg, except in Italy where the heavy weight pig production produces carcasses of around 150 kg. The average leanness of the carcasses is close to 60 percent in some countries but lower in most. The meatiest carcasses are produced when Pietrain boars are used as sires.

 

All over Europe there is a strong trend to modernise the slaughtering industry by closing small and old plants and concentrating the slaughter to fewer very big plants. This change will have a dramatic effect on the implementation and use of modern systems for classification and traceability of carcasses and products. In most countries the majority of carcasses are classified and irrespective of instruments used, the aim is to get an estimate of leanness or meatiness expressed in percentage units. In most EU-15 countries EU-approved methods are used. All instruments except Autofom and handheld ultrasound devices use invasive probing to measure thickness of fat and muscle.

 

 

 

 

In all countries within EU-15 the estimate of lean meat percentage is calculated with equations developed from dissection of samples of carcasses according to the official EU regulations. In the NAS countries programmes are implemented to perform tests of devices and dissections.

 

In all countries and markets where carcass quality is expressed in terms of meatiness the market price along the production line from farmer to cutting enterprises is based on carcass weight and lean meat percentage. Very few pigs are paid according to live weight.

 

In most countries personnel from the abattoirs perform classification. These people are trained and educated by the company or by external bodies like private organisations or state departments. Some forms of control programmes are implemented to guarantee professional use of the systems and devices. To some extent those programmes are used for official statistics about production quantities and quality.

 

Information from the questionnaires, presented country by country

 

Denmark

More than 21 million pigs were slaughtered in Denmark during 2001 in more than 100 plants. In 23 of the plants more than 1000 pigs were slaughtered per week. A rebuilding programme is on the way with the result that the slaughtering will be concentrated in rather few very big and modern plants.

 

The production is based on three-breed crosses with Duroc or Duroc/Hampshire sires mated to Landrace/Yorkshire sows. As a great part of the meat is destined for the world market, the demands for lean carcasses have resulted in meaty carcasses (60 % lean meat) with an average carcass weight of 78 kg.

 

Denmark has for a long time been the leading country for development of devices for carcass classification from the early version of the KS-meter to the technically advanced multiple probe classification centres. The development has continued with ultrasound as the base. Both handheld ultrasound devices and Autofom are now available on the World market.

 

In Denmark the classification centres are used for the majority of the slaughtering. In smaller plants handheld devices with invasive probes or ultrasound are used. Within the near future the centres will be replaced with Autofom.

 

Personnel at the local plants operate the equipment in use. A private and national organisation monitors the control. Independent inspectors visit the plants and perform controls that cover both dressing, weighing conditions, grading instruments and responsible operators.

 

Every day the equipment is controlled before grading commences. Every week the plants must send the classification results to the classification organisation. The inspectors check that the results are as expected compared with other weeks and with the average results for all Danish slaughterhouses. Too great deviations and variation will result in changes in the systems.

 

The slaughter plants and the private organisation are together responsible for the training and education of the personnel.

 

Belgium

More than 11 million pigs were slaughtered in Belgium during 2001. There were 31 plants slaughtering more than 1000 pigs per year. Most of the pigs were three-breed crosses with Pietrain boars as terminal sires on crossbred sows. The pigs are slaughtered at about 120-kg live weight giving lean carcasses (60 % lean meat) weighing 90 kg.

 

All carcasses are classified with the handheld invasive probes CGM or PG 200 and according to Belgian legislation. A vision system can be used for the estimation of ham conformation (Pietrain pigs with very muscular hams).

 

The classification system is national and independent inspectors supervise and perform the control of carcass presentation (slaughter dressing), classification and carcass identification and data collection systems. Classification is done by slaughterhouse personnel and to some extent by the interprofessional organisation IVB. The national government is responsible for the overall control. The classifiers are educated and trained by the slaughterhouse, the probe companies and IVB.

 

France

In France more than 26 million pigs were slaughtered during 2001. The majority of the pigs were slaughtered at 60 plants slaughtering more than 1000 pigs per week.

 

Most of the pigs come from three-bred crosses with Pietrain boars or synthetic lines mated to crossbred sows (mainly with Landrace breed types). The carcass weight was close to 90 kg with lean meat percentage of 60 %.

 

More than 90 percent of the carcasses are classified with the manual probe CGM. In some small plants a manual ruler is used.

 

Classification is performed by slaughterhouse personnel or by a private organisation. A governmental and national organisation has national control over the system.

 

The control of classification is well developed and includes a daily check of the data from the measurements as well as control visits by independent inspectors.

 

The classification and control system in France is mainly implemented by regional organisations. These organisations are generally interprofessional. The biggest one, called Uniporc Ouest, has its own personnel, who perform weighing, classification and self-control in many slaughterhouses covering 75% of the national slaughter. The other regional organisations only have the material in their own region with one or two employees for the servicing and the control. Some slaughterhouses do not belong to regional organisations. These slaughterhouses perform weighing and classification with their own personnel and devices. The national governmental organisation, called OFIVAL, is responsible for the control of weighing, classification and marking. Their inspectors control all the French slaughterhouses, whether or not they are members of a regional organisation.

 

Spain

More than 36 million pigs were slaughtered in Spain during 2001 in both small and very big plants. Thus Spain is the second largest pork producing country in Europe. A great part of the production is destined for other EU countries. The average carcass weighed 79 kg with 58 percent of lean meat. The dominating production is based on Pietrain, Duroc and Landrace boars mated to Landrace/Yorkshire crossbred sows.

 

Classification is not performed in all plants.  The handheld manual probes FOM and HGP are used to some extent. The Autofom has newly been approved and use of this instrument is expected to increase the proportion of classified carcasses.

 

Operators employed by the plants perform the classification. Because no national organisation is operating the plants themselves perform the control. This control covers dressing and weighing and visual assessment of the operators and technical check of the instruments. The personnel are educated and trained by the local plants. The classification systems and control programmes are under development.

 

Germany

Germany is the largest pork producing country in Europe with about 40 million pigs slaughtered. Most of the pigs are crossbred with great influence of the German Landrace breed. Despite the great production, Germany is a net importer of pork products, mainly from other EU countries. The carcasses had 93 kg average weight and 56.7 % lean content.

 

The Danish invasive device FOM is the most used grading instrument. The implementation of new technology and price setting systems is on the way in larger plants. Autofom is installed and tested in some plants and 12 instruments are in use (Feb. 2003). Dissections of samples of carcasses according to the EU regulations were made during the last years.

 

No information is available concerning control programmes but to all devices, automatic or not, are connected some forms of tests and result presentations that can be used for control.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Italy

In Italy more than 13 million pigs were slaughtered during 2001. There are two pig populations in Italy destined for light and heavy weight carcasses. Recently (Dec 2001) two grading probes (FOM and HGP 4) were approved for classification according to the EU-rules. Both FOM and Hennessy Grading Probe (HGP) will be used in practise

 

An organisation for implementation, routine classification and control are planned, but there is no control system in use at present.

 

The Netherlands

The production of pork has varied during the last years depending on outbreaks of different pig illnesses but numbers slaughtered returned to over 20 million pigs during 2002. The slaughter pigs are crosses of white pigs and Hampshire or Duroc boars and to some extent different synthetic lines. The average carcass weight was close to 80 kg with 57 % lean meat percentage. The slaughter industry has been rationalised during the years resulting in a few big plants slaughtering most of the pigs.

 

Classification is performed with HGP and calculation of lean meat percentage is based on one fat and one muscle thickness measurement. To some extent ham conformation scores are used to complement the estimate of lean meat percentage.

 

Personnel belonging to an independent organisation perform classification. A national organisation is responsible for the control programme.

 

Ireland

In Ireland 3.4 million pigs were slaughtered during 2001. A crossbreeding programme with Large White x Landrace sows mated with Pietrain or Duroc boars is running for the production. The average carcass eight was 72 kg and the lean meat content was 58.4 %. The pigs are slaughtered in 5 plants, approved for the EU-market. All carcasses are classified with the HGP, version 2.

 

The abattoirs employ and educate the personnel performing the measurements. They are supervised and controlled by inspectors from the national government. The control includes carcass dressing, weighing and classification.

 

Lithuania

About 800 000 pigs are slaughtered every year in more than 200 small abattoirs. Most of the pigs are crossbred with several breeds used. About 60 percent of the carcasses are graded with the manual FOM-probe, but because of the many small plants supplying local markets it is not economic to classify all carcasses. The classification is mainly performed by a governmental organisation on a national basis. The personnel are trained once a year by the Veterinary Academy. The inspectors visiting the plants control the grading with respect of measuring points and make a visual check of the operators performing the measurements.

 

 

Estonia

In Estonia about 500 000 pigs are produced and slaughtered at 3 plants. All slaughter pigs are crossbred with Pietrain and Hampshire as sires on crossbred white sows. The average carcass weight was 77 kg during 2001 and the average lean meat content was 56 percent. The production has run without classification but new equipment will be bought and dissections will be done as base for a system that fulfils the EU regulations. There are plans for a governmental and national system.

 

Slovenia

In Slovenia about 500 000 pigs are slaughtered in abattoirs every year.  In abattoirs slaughtering more than 200 pigs per week carcasses are classified with the so-called ZP method with electronic calliper. About 65 percent of the carcasses are graded according to SEUROP.

 

Slaughter pigs are two, three or four breed crosses, produced in a crossbreeding programme based on Landrace and Large White as maternal lines and Large White, Duroc and Pietrain as paternal lines. Results for the year 2002 show average leanness of 55.4 percent for 82 kg carcass weight.

 

A neutral, private control body, using the so-called ZP method, performs classification. The appointed experts from public institutes perform the monitoring of the classification made with the manually operated ZP-probe. A private control body trains the classification personnel, but the public institutes, which also issue the license for the operators, do the certification of operators.

 

The classification method currently in use was implemented in 1996. It is based on the total dissection trial according to EU legislation. Changes in the grading system are expected in the near future, since the HGP instrument will to be introduced in order to harmonise the methods.

 

 

Poland

Poland is one of the largest pork producing countries in Europe. More than 20 million pigs were slaughtered during 2001. Most of the pigs were slaughtered and processed in more than 2000 slaughter plants, making it difficult to implement a national classification system. Production is based on crossbreeding systems with increasing use of breeds from Western Europe. The average carcass weight was 80 kg with average lean meat content of 50 percent.

 

About 70 percent of the carcasses are classified with different types of manual probes. During the last years Autofom has been tested for approval according to EU rules.

 

A governmental and national organisation with independent inspectors monitors the classification. The inspectors make control of dressing of the carcasses, and a visual control of equipment, operator and measuring points twice a year.

 

Hungary

In Hungary about 3.3 million pigs were slaughtered during year 2002. 12 abattoirs slaughter more then 1000 pigs per week and all are approved for export to the EU-market. About 100 plants slaughter pigs for the local domestic market. Most slaughter pigs are crossbred pigs in a production plan using European breeds. The carcass weight was on average 90 kg and the lean meat content was 53 percent.

 

More than 80 percent of the carcasses are classified with the FOM probe. The operators are employed by a private organisation and supervised by a national governmental body. The classification of pig carcasses in Hungary is organised and performed in accordance to rules valid in EU-15.

 

 

Bulgaria

In Bulgaria the production of pork is mainly based on local breeds influenced by Landrace and Yorkshire breeds. During 2001 about 2 million pigs were slaughtered and the results reported indicate rather fat (45 percent lean meat) carcasses weighing 70 kg.

At present no classification is performed but one Hennessy Grading Probe has been used on research pigs, indicating the average carcass leanness.

 

Most of the pigs are slaughtered in small local plants, making it very difficult for implementation of a national system for classification.

 

Slovak Republic

In the Slovak Republic the production of slaughter pigs, annual slaughter of 1.8 million pigs, is based on 138 000 sows of different breeds mated to sires from Duroc, Pietrain or synthetic lines. The pigs are fed to a size giving carcasses weighing 90 kg with 52 percent of lean meat. FOM is used for classification in the larger plants. In smaller plants the simpler ZP method is used.

 

Czech Republic

In the Czech Republic about 3.6 million pigs are slaughtered every year. Production is based on pure Large White and Landrace sows sired with Duroc, Hampshire, Pietrain and Belgian Landrace boars. During 2001 the average carcass weight was 88 kg and the lean meat percentage was 54 %.

 

Most of the pigs are graded with the FOM probes but in small plants the ZP method is used. A governmental organisation is responsible for classification and control in the larger plants.

 

There are many plants in operation but a programme to modernise the slaughtering will result in the closure of plants and the building of new facilities. The programme for classification will undergo changes in the near future.

 

 

 

 

Cyprus

In Cyprus about 650 000 pigs are slaughtered every year. During 2001 the average carcass weighed 75 kg with 55 percentage lean meat content. The production is based on crosses with Dalland (70 %), Seghers and PIC synthetic breeds. The male pigs are not castrated. The pigs are slaughtered at 8 abattoirs with more than 200 pigs per week and 20 local and smaller plants.

 

Work is started to implement handhold invasive probes and the HGP is tested for use on the larger plants. A dissection trial has been performed according to the EU rules with 4 main joints. The organization of the future control system is not yet decided.

 

 

The Nordic countries

 

In the three Nordic countries Norway, Finland and Sweden there is active work for cooperation between pork producing farmers and breeding organisations. In this breeding programme four breeds are used. The two white breeds Large White and Landrace are mainly used for production of crossbred sows. These sows are then sired with semen from Duroc or Hampshire boars. This will influence pork production and pork quality in the future. In all three countries the Hennessy Grading Probe (HGP) is used for classification and estimation of the lean meat content in the carcasses. The measuring sites are the same but different equations are used. Dissections have been made according to the official EU rules.

 

 

Sweden

During 2001 about 3.3 million pigs were slaughtered in 20 abattoirs. In 7 of them more than 2 000 pigs were slaughtered per week. The production is based on a three-breed crossing system with Duroc or Hampshire boars used on crossbred white sows. The average carcass weight was 89 kg and the average lean meat content was 57 %.

 

Since 1984 classification is based on lean meat percentage calculated from two fat and one muscle thickness measurements taken with the Hennessy Grading Probe. The control is based on visits of independent inspectors from the governmental board of agriculture. This control is based on visual inspection of the operators and technical control of the instrument. The measuring site is identified and the probe direction is controlled. At the end of every week the plant has to send a statistical report to the Board of Agriculture for the summary report of function. These reports are also used for the yearly result summary.

 

The classifiers have to follow a one year training and educational programme before being certified as classifiers.

 

 

 

Norway

In Norway 1.3 million pigs were slaughtered during 2002. The average carcass weight was 80 kg and the lean meat content was 56 %. The production is aimed for the domestic market. Most slaughter pigs are three-breed crosses with Duroc or Duroc-cross boars as terminal sire.

 

All carcasses are classified with HGP version 4 with colour function. The official control, organised by Norway Meat, includes both visits by inspectors and central statistical evaluation of data sent to this office.

 

Finland

In Finland 2.2 million pigs were slaughtered during 2001. As in Sweden, most of the slaughter pigs were crosses from Large White x Landrace sows sired with Hampshire boars. Rather few slaughter plants are operating in Finland. Pork products are exported to markets near by in Russia and Sweden mainly.

 

All carcasses are classified with the Hennessy Grading Probe (HGP) version 2 and 4. The measuring sites are the same as in Sweden and Norway. The plants and the official governmental organisation educate the personnel.

 

The official control programme is organised by a governmental organisation, operating independently of the plants.

 

 

Summary

This report is based on results obtained through a questionnaire sent to all member states in EU and to NAS-countries. To some extent official statistics is used as a complement. The aim was to gather information for the elaboration of the Quality Assurance Program (QAP), one of the tasks in the project.

 

In this report the production of pork in Europe is shortly described. Nearly 200 million pigs are slaughtered. In most of the countries crossbreeding is used with White breeds in the sow population. Duroc, Hampshire and Pietrain boars are used as terminal sires. To some extent boars of synthetic lines are used.

 

In most countries the pigs are slaughtered at a live weight less than 125 kg, giving carcasses weighing 93 kg or less. The EU-rules for dressing are followed. Classification is performed in all countries and methods based on fat- and muscle thickness measurement are used for calculation of the lean meat content, expressed as a percentage of the whole carcass weight, in accordance with EU-rules.

 

National governmental control programmes are used in most countries in order to keep the grading official with high confidence throughout the industry and market. The organisations responsible for control are already available in most countries. Thus the implementation of a Quality Assurance Programme for classification will be easy. 


Table 1. Pork production and classification of pig carcasses in European countries

 

 

Country    (ISO Country Codes)

dk

 se

  fr

de

es     

be

ie

hu

nl

si

pl

cz

lt

cy

bg

sk

ee

Pigs slaughtered, million/year

21

3.5

26

40

36.

11.3

3.4

3.4

20

0.5

20

3.6

0.8

0.6

2

1.8

0.5

Capacity:

No of plants slaughtering

no of pigs per week

<200

Totally

106

10

 

 

 

41

 

96

 

>10

210

400

 

20

105

 

3

EU approved

2

0

-

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

200-1000

Totally

7

4

 

 

 

5

 

46

 

5

22

1800

 

  5

36

 

 

EU approved

6

3

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

2

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

>1000

Totally

23

8

60

 

 

31

5

12

 

3

 

300

 

  3

3

 

 

EU approved

23

8

60

 

 

31

5

12

 

3

 

 

 

  1

 

 

 

% pigs classified according to EU rules

99

100

100

99

 

99

99

 

 

65

70

 

60

 

0

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Results from slaughter 2001

Carcass weight

78

89

89

90

79

90

72

90

80

83

80

 

88

 75

70

90

77

Lean meat %

60

57

60

57

57

60

58

53

57

55

50

 

54

 55

45

53

56

Grading system used

(A=automatic

M=manual)

Probe

M,A

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

 

M

M

M

 M

M

 

 

Ultrasound

A

 

M

MA

A

 

 

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

 

 

M

ZP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M

 

M

M

 

M

 

 

M

 

Ruler

 

 

M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other systems

Yes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 2.  Organization and performance of the classification and control in different countries

 

Country  (ISO Country Codes)

dk

se

fr

de

es

nl

be

ie

hu

sk

si

pl

cz

ee

lt

Classification operators employed by 1

L

L

P

 

L

P

L, P

L

P

 

P

L

G

L

G

Monito-ring organisa--tion

Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

If Yes, is the control:

National/regional? N/R

N

N

N

N

 

 

N

N

N

N

N

N

 

N

N

Private/governmental? P/G

P

G

P

G

 

G

P/G

G

G

G

G

G

 

G

G

Incl. inspectors? Yes/No

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

Independent inspectors? Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

If No, is there any control of classification? Yes/No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Control of

Carcass presentation Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Weighing conditions

Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

No

Times from bleeding Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

 

No

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

Weight of gambrels Yes/No

Yes

No

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

Scale (tare, accuracy) Yes/No

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

 

 

Yes

Yes

No

Measuring points Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Fat/muscle depths

Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

 

 

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

No

How? (see Annex 3)

Metal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operators

Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Visually Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Statistically Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

 

Yes

Equipment

Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

No

Yes

Yes

 

No

Test frequency D/W/M 2

D

D

M

W

D

W

M

 

O

 

 

M

 

 

 

Manuel test Yes/No

Yes

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

 

 

Statistical test Yes/No

Yes

Yes

 

 

 

 

No

 

Yes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Identification Yes/No

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

Yes

Data collection/transfer Yes/No

Yes

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Control without inspectors (describe) (see Annex 4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other information  Yes/No  (if Yes, see Annex 5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are operators trained?

Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

By whom? 1

L, P

L, G

P

L,P

L

 

 

L

 

 

P

O

 

G

G

 

1                      L=Local slaughterhouse                                    2                D=Daily

G=Governmental organisation                                          W=Weekly

P=Private organisation                                                       M=Monthly

O=Other